What are content and chapters of ISGOTT or The International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals ?

The International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals, or ISGOTT as it is now widely known, has become the standard reference work on the safe operation of oil tankers and the terminals they serve.

It is well known that  Safety is critical to the tanker industry. ISGOTT continues to provide the best technical guidance on tanker and terminal operations.This is the definitive Guide to the safe carriage and handling of crude oil and petroleum products on tankers and at terminals.

The Guide is now divided into four sections:
  • General Information;
  • Tanker Information;
  • Terminal Information and
  • The Management of the Tanker and Terminal Interface
Chapters of ISGOTT are :
CHAPTER 1:  HAZARDS OF PETROLEUM

1.1    Flammability
1.2   Flammability Classification
1.3   Gas Density
1.4   Toxicity

CHAPTER 2:  GENERAL PRECAUTIONS ON TANKERS

2.1   General Principles
2.2   Smoking And Naked Lights
2.3   Galley
2.4   Portable Lamps And Electrical Equipment
2.5   Fixed Electrical Equipment
2.6   Synthetic Clothing
2.7   Radio Transmitting Antennae
2.8   Hot Work
2.9   Use Of Tools
2.10   Aluminium
2.11   Cathodic Protection Anodes In Cargo Tanks
2.12   Spontaneous Combustion
2.13   Auto-Ignition
2.14   Engine And Boiler Rooms
2.15   Cold Weather Precautions
2.16   Entry Into Enclosed Spaces
2.17   Pumprooms

CHAPTER 3:  ARRIVAL IN PORT

3.1   Exchange Of Information
3.2   Preparation For Arrival
3.3   Entering Or Leaving Port
3.4   Capacity Of Jetty Fendering
3.5   Mooring At Jetty Berths
3.6   Buoy Moorings
3.7   Emergency Release Procedures

CHAPTER 4:  GENERAL PRECAUTIONS WHILE A TANKER IS AT A PETROLEUM BERTH 

4.1   Safety Precautions And Emergency Procedures
4.2   Management Of Moorings While Alongside
4.3   Management Of Moorings At Buoy Berths
4.4   State Of Readiness
4.5   Communications
4.6   Access Between Ship And Shore
4.7   Notices
4.8   Smoking
4.9   Galley Stoves And Cooking Appliances
4.10   Fixed And Portable Electrical Equipment
4.11   Communications Equipment
4.12   Work On A Jetty Or Petroleum Berth Or On A Tanker At A Berth

CHAPTER 5:  LIAISON BETWEEN TANKER AND TERMINAL BEFORE CARGO HANDLING

5.1   Terminal’s Advice To The Tanker
5.2   Tanker’s Advice To The Terminal
5.3   Agreed Loading Plan
5.4   Inspection Of Ship’s Cargo Tanks Before Loading
5.5   Agreed Discharge Plan
5.6   Communications
5.7   Ship/Shore Safety Check List

CHAPTER 6:  PRECAUTIONS BEFORE AND DURING CARGO HANDLING AND OTHER CARGO TANK OPERATIONS 

6.1   Openings In Superstructures
6.2   Openings In Cargo Tanks
6.3   Pumproom Precautions
6.4   Testing Of Cargo System Alarms And Trips
6.5   Ship And Shore Cargo Connections
6.6   Cargo Hoses
6.7   Metal Cargo Arms
6.8   Climatic Conditions
6.9   Accidental Oil Spillage And Leakage
6.10   Ship/Shore Insulating, Earthing And Bonding
6.11   Proximity To Other Vessels
6.12   Helicopter Operations

CHAPTER 7:  HANDLING OF CARGO AND BALLAST  

7.1   Supervision And Control
7.2   Measuring And Sampling
7.3   Operation Of Pumps And Valves
7.4   Handling Static Accumulator Cargoes
7.5   Deballasting
7.6   Loading Of Cargo
7.7   Loading At Terminals Having Vapour Emission Control Systems
7.8   Monitoring Of Void And Ballast Spaces
7.9   Discharge Of Cargo
7.10   Failure Of The Inert Gas System During Discharge
7.11   Pipeline And Hose Clearing
7.12   Transfers Between Vessels
7.13   Ballasting
7.14   Tank Over Pressurisation And Under Pressurisation

CHAPTER 8:  DOUBLE HULL OPERATIONS

8.1   Stability Considerations
8.2   Routine Monitoring Of Double Hull Spaces
8.3   Tank Entry Procedures For Double Hull Spaces
8.4   Ventilation Procedures
8.5    Action To Be Taken In The Event Of Cargo Leakage
8.6   Inerting Double Hull Spaces
8.7   Gas Freeing And Tank Entry After Inerting
8.8   Tank Cleaning
8.9   Handling Ballast After A Leak

CHAPTER 9:  TANK CLEANING AND GAS FREEING

9.1   Supervision And Preparations
9.2   Cargo Tank Washing And Cleaning
9.3   Gas Freeing
9.4   Crude Oil Washing
9.5   Special Tank Cleaning Procedures

CHAPTER 10:  FIXED INERT GAS SYSTEMS

10.1   General
10.2   Sources
10.3   Quality
10.4   Method Of Replacing Tank Atmospheres
10.5   Cargo Tank Atmosphere Control
10.6   Application To Cargo Tank Operations
10.7   Precautions To Be Taken To Avoid Health Hazards
10.8   Cargo Tank Protection
10.9   Emergency Inert Gas Supply
10.10   Product Carriers Required To Be Fitted With An Inert Gas System
10.11   Combination Carriers
10.12   Inert Gas System Failure
10.13   Inert Gas Plant Repairs

CHAPTER 11:  ENCLOSED SPACE ENTRY

11.1   General
11.2   Respiratory Hazards
11.3   Atmosphere Tests Prior To Entry
11.4   Conditions For Entry Into Enclosed Spaces
11.5   Respiratory Protective Equipment
11.6   Work In Enclosed Spaces
11.7   Rescue From Enclosed Spaces
11.8   Resuscitation

CHAPTER 12:  COMBINATION CARRIERS

12.1   General Instructions
12.2   Types Of Combination Carriers
12.3   Void Spaces, Duct Keels And Pipe Tunnels
12.4   Slack Holds In Combination Carriers
12.5   Longitudinal Stress
12.6   Venting Of Cargo Holds
12.7   Hatch Covers
12.8   Openings Into Cargo Holds
12.9     Tank Washing
12.10   Carriage Of Slops When Trading As A Dry Bulk Carrier
12.11   Leakage Into Ballast Tanks On Combination Carriers
12.12  Inert Gas Systems
12.13   Testing Of Cargo Tanks And Enclosed Spaces On Dry Bulk Voyages
12.14   Cargo Change-Over Check Lists
12.15   Discharge Of Dry Bulk Cargo

CHAPTER 13:  PACKAGED CARGOES

13.1   Dangerous Goods
13.2   Petroleum And Other Flammable Liquids
13.3   Liquefied Gases
13.4   Tetraethyl Lead (Tel) And Tetramethyl Lead (Tml)

CHAPTER 14 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

14.1   General
14.2   Terminal Emergency Plan
14.3   Tanker Emergency Plan
14.4   Fire On A Tanker At Sea Or At Anchor
14.5   Fire On A Tanker At A Terminal
14.6   Fire Or Explosion On A Berth
14.7   Jettison Of Cargo

PART II: TECHNICAL INFORMATION

CHAPTER 15:  BASIC PROPERTIES OF PETROLEUM

15.1   Vapour Pressure
15.2   Flammability
15.3   Density Of Hydrocarbon Gases

CHAPTER 16:  TOXICITY OF PETROLEUM AND ASSOCIATED SUBSTANCES

16.1   General
16.2   Liquid Petroleum
16.3   Petroleum Gases
16.4   Benzene And Other Aromatic Hydrocarbons
16.5   Hydrogen Sulphide
16.6   Gasolines Containing Tetraethyl Lead (Tel) Or Tetramethyl Lead (Tml)
16.7   Inert Gas
16.8   Oxygen Deficiency

CHAPTER 17: HYDROCARBON GAS EVOLUTION AND DISPERSION

17.1   Introduction
17.2   Gas Evolution And Venting
17.3   Gas Dispersion
17.4   Variables Affecting Dispersion
17.5   Minimising Hazards From Vented Gas
17.6   Loading Of Very High Vapour Pressure Cargoes

CHAPTER 18:  GAS INDICATORS

18.1   Measurement Of Hydrocarbon Concentration
18.2   Catalytic Filament Combustible Gas Indicator (Cfcg)
18.3   Non-Catalytic Heated Filament Gas Indicator
18.4   Refractive Index Meter
18.5   Fixed Flammable Gas Detection Installations
18.6   Measurement Of Low Concentrations Of Toxic Gases
18.7   Measurement Of Oxygen Concentrations
18.8   Use Of Oxygen Analysers
18.9   Gas Sample Lines And Sampling Procedures
18.10   Filters In Sample Lines

CHAPTER 19:  ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND INSTALLATIONS

19.1   Dangerous And Hazardous Areas
19.2   Electrical Equipment And Installations
19.3   Inspection And Maintenance Of Electrical Equipment
19.4   Electrical Repairs, Maintenance And Test Work At Terminals

CHAPTER 20:  STATIC ELECTRICITY

20.1   Principles Of Electrostatic Hazards
20.2   General Precautions Against Electrostatic Hazards
20.3   Electrostatic Hazards When Handling Static Accumulator Oils
20.4   Other Sources Of Electrostatic Hazards
20.5   Dipping, Ullaging And Sampling
20.6   Earthing, Bonding And Cathodic Protection

CHAPTER 21:   PRESSURE SURGE

21.1     Introduction
21.2    Generation Of Pressure Surge
21.3    Assessment Of Pressure Surges
21.4    Reduction Of Pressure Surge Hazard

CHAPTER 22:  FIRE-FIGHTING – THEORY AND EQUIPMENT

22.1     Theory Of Fire-Fighting
22.2     Types Of Fire
22.3     Extinguishing Agents – Cooling
22.4     Extinguishing Agents – Smothering
22.5     Flame Inhibitors
22.6     Tanker Fire-Fighting Equipment
22.7     Tanker Fixed Fire-Fighting Installations – Cooling
22.8    Tanker Fixed Fire-Fighting Installations – Smothering
22.9     Terminal Fire-Fighting Equipment
22.10    Terminal Portable Fire-Fighting Equipment
22.11     Terminal Fixed Fire-Fighting Equipment
22.12    Water-Borne Fire-Fighting Equipment
22.13     Protective Clothing

CHAPTER 23:  PYROPHORIC IRON SULPHIDE 

23.1    Pyrophoric Oxidation
23.2    Formation Of Pyrophors
23.3    Prevention Of Pyrophoric Ignition In Cargo Tanks

CHAPTER 24: THE FLAMMABILITY HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE HANDLING, STORAGE AND CARRIAGE OF RESIDUAL FUEL OILS

24.1    Nature Of Hazard
24.2   Flashpoint And Headspace Flammability Measurement
24.3   Precautionary Measures

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A     Ship/Shore Safety Check List, Guidelines and Specimen letter
APPENDIX B     Fire Instructions
APPENDIX C     Oil Cargo Hose
APPENDIX D    Typical Insulating Flange Joint
APPENDIX E    International Shore Fire Connection
APPENDIX F    Hot Work Permit
APPENDIX G    Cold Work Permit
APPENDIX H   Electrical Isolation Certificate (EIC)
APPENDIX I     Enclosed Space Entry Permi.

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